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Labour practices

LA3 Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees

Legally mandated benefits (such as contributions to health care, disability, maternity, education, holidays and retirement)vary from country to country, as do the additional benefits the Adecco Group provides.

Additional benefits for employees usually depend on position and number of years served, while additional benefits for associates are offered in the context of attraction and retention programmes. Most of the larger subsidiaries run such programmes, offering several kinds of additional benefits, including free or discounted access to further training, discount vouchers for shopping and travelling, and extra holidays. Eligibility usually depends on the number of hours worked.

LA4 Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining agreements

In the Temporary Agency Work (TAW) Industry, multitude of Collective Bargaining Agreements (CLAs) stipulate the framework relationship and functioning of workers and companies rights and responsibilities. Globally, if at all, there are great differences in the coverage of employees by CLAs, depending on national legislation. The countries with the highest percentage of employees covered by CLAs are countries with mature labour legislation, mostly on the European continent. But even in Europe, there are big differences, summarised in 3 different types of CLAs: Company CLAs (signed between user companies and their staff), TAW Industry CLAs (signed between Agency Work National Associations and Industry Trade Unions) and Employer Association CLAs signed on behalf of the TAW Industry with Global Trade Unions. Due to the number of countries (and national labour legislation frameworks) Adecco operates in and the variety of CLAs (with variations according to Country, Industry, Sector and Customer) it has engaged in, the Adecco Group has no record of the percentage of employees covered by CLAs.

In November 2008, UNI Global Union and Ciett Corporate Members, including the Adecco Group, signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to create a partnership and global social dialogue to achieve fair conditions for the temporary agency work industry and the 9 million temporary agency workers on assignment daily around the world. The agreement is global in scope with mutual commitments to – amongst others – respect the freedom of association and the right to collective bargaining as guaranteed by the International Labour Organisation ILO.

Further documents were signed between Eurociett and UNI-Europa (the European level), as ‘Joint declarations’:

  • Eurociett/UNI-Europa: Joint Declaration on the Sectoral Social Dialogue on Agency Work, signed in 2000
  • Eurociett/Uni-Europa Joint Declaration within the framework of the ‘Flexicurity debate’ as launched and defined by the EU Commission, signed in 2007
  • Eurociett/UNI-Europa Joint Declaration on the Directive on working conditions for temporary agency workers, signed in 2008
  • Eurociett/UNI-Europa Joint Declaration on Training for Temporary Agency Workers: Joint actions developed by sectoral social partners play a key role in facilitating skills upgrading, signed in 2009

LA5 Minimum notice period(s) regarding operational changes

To date, the Adecco Group does not, at a corporate level, gather data for this core indicator. Generally, our workforces are informed about operational changes at the first opportunity. In several countries, the Adecco Group employees receive information on operational changes through their representatives on the national works councils or enterprise committees, with notice periods varying according to the agreement at national level. In line with EU regulation, the Adecco Group has since 1999 been following the minimum notice period regarding operational changes stipulated in the PACE (platform for Adecco Communication in Europe) Agreement. With the change of the EU regulation underway under the ‘Recast Directive’, Adecco is in the process of setting up the new ‘Adecco European Works Council’ Agreement that will regulate the minimum notice period regarding operational changes from 2011 on.

LA6 Percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint management-worker health and safety committees

Adecco Group does not run a formal joint management-worker health and safety committee. At corporate and national level, issues of health and safety are (formally and informally) in the focus of Adecco and measures are being taken to guarantee standards are being upheld (see also paragraph “Preventing accidents and diseases”, page 32 ). Due to the GRI number of Countries Adecco operates in (60) and the variety of regulation set-ups regarding the handling of health and safety issues (in many countries not being handled formally by joint management-worker committees), Adecco Group but has no record of the percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint management-worker health and safety committees.

LA8 Programmes in place regarding serious diseases

There are appropriate measures in place to meet work-related needs for training and prevention – e.g. for associates in the health care professions – depending on local conditions and requirements. Education, training, counselling, prevention, and risk-control programmes to assist other people or community members regarding serious diseases are usually a governmental responsibility. In countries where this is not the case, Adecco Group has little or no presence, and no means to take on this additional role.

LA9 Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements with trade unions

Adecco Group does not have signed a formal agreement covering health and safety topics with any trade union. At corporate and national level, issues of health and safety are (formally and informally) in the focus of Adecco and measures are being taken to guarantee standards are being upheld. Due to the number of Countries (60) Adecco operates in and the variety of regulation set-ups and the wide range of agreements with trade unions regarding the handling of health and safety issues (in many countries, there are no agreements with trade unions on any topics), Adecco Group but has no record of the health and safety topics covered in formal agreements with trade unions.

LA10 Average hours of training per year per employee, by employee category

Training for employees and associates is a top priority for the Adecco Group. A precise Group-wide method for counting training hours has not yet been developed. The time invested in training is mainly for formal internal and external training courses, individual online training at work and at home, and informal training on the job. Some figures on training are provided on pages 48 and 49.

LA13 Composition of governance bodies

Details on the composition of the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee are provided in the 2010 Annual Report, pages 186–189 and 195–198.

Governance bodies 2010

Male

Female

Nr. of
nationalities

 

 

 

 

Board of Directors (total 9 members)

7

2

6

Executive Committee (total 12 members)

12

0

7

LA14 Ratio of basic salary of men to women by employee category

Adecco Group is providing equal employment opportunities to all employees and applicants for employment, regardless of gender or any other personal characteristic protected by law. This of course also includes compensating colleagues and associates fairly for their work, regardless of their gender.

LA15 Return to work and retention rates after parental leave, by gender

This is a new GRI indicator (released in March 2011). For the time being, we can report against this indicator for the Adecco Group Headquarter and Adecco Switzerland 2009/2010:

100% return to work after parental leave of female employees. There were no parental leaves of male employees in 2009/2010.